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« James 3—Brothers and Sisters as Teachers? Commentary and Discussion with Craig Blomberg | Main | The Basics of Verbal Aspect: 1 of 5 by Constantine Campbell »

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I can think of another reason why the man might want to marry the woman again: if the series of marriages is being used as a cover for prostitution. In Shia Islam today there is a real custom of "temporary marriages", properly religiously arranged, by which a man marries a woman for one night, for money, and so (since polygamy is permitted, but not polyandry) can use her as a prostitute with religious sanction. The legislation in Deuteronomy has the effect of making this much harder. I don't know if the Hebrew text could be understood as referring to this kind of situation, but I guess this is worth investigating.

Great post!

Just a couple of questions: (1) What if the first husband wanted to take back the woman whom he previously disgraced, but not for the money she may have accumulated from her second marriage? What if the hard-hearted husband actually underwent a change of heart? I realize the text seemingly doesn't speak to this condition but that is somewhat puzzling. Because most of us are hard-hearted and because God is desirous - yea, even in the business - of changed human hearts (E.g., circumcision of the heart, etc.), is it not odd that the text would not allow for this possibility?

Also, are there any grammars that do discuss the hutqattel stem?

Lastly, I'm not familiar with "Hebrew Studies." Is that a scholarly journal or quarterly? And would they be accessible from the online ATLA database for example?

Thanks much for any direction.

The law does not allow the first husband to remarry the woman he has humiliated under any circumstances--no matter what his motivations or his contrition. He has disqualified himself. Certainly God would welcome his change of heart, but that would not change the situation.

Grammars at times mention the hutqattel (especially the reference grammars), but they give little attention to its semantics.

Hebrew Studies is a scholarly peer-reviewed journal associated with the National Association of Professors of Hebrew, headquartered at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Thanks for the responses.

Les McFall has an interested way to deal with the exception clause in Matthew 19:9. He has written a 43 page paper that reviews the changes in the Greek made by Erasmus that effect the way Matthew 19:9 has been translated. I reviewed McFall's paper at Except For Fornication Clause of Matthew 19:9. I would love to hear some feedback on this position.

Les McFall has an interested way to deal with the exception clause in Matthew 19:9. He has written a 43 page paper that reviews the changes in the Greek made by Erasmus that effect the way Matthew 19:9 has been translated. I reviewed McFall's paper at Except For Fornication Clause of Matthew 19:9. I would love to hear some feedback on this position.

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